Archive for November 7th, 2007

Statistics Canada Reports Canadian Music Industry Turning Healthy Profit

The official Canadian Music Week won't take place until March in Toronto, but this week the Canadian government has staged its own Canadian music week.  Days after the release of the Industry Canada commissioned study on the correlation between P2P and CD sales, Statistics Canada has just released a report […]

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November 7, 2007 11 comments News

McMurdy on Verner’s CAB Speech

Dierdre McMurdy covers Canadian Heritage Minister Josee Verner's speech yesterday to the CAB, noting that new fees for over-the-air television is a longshot and that a new copyright bill is about six weeks away.

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November 7, 2007 2 comments Must Reads

How the Internet On Cable Became the Internet as Cable

When Rogers Communications began promoting its Rogers@Home high-speed Internet service nearly a decade ago, the company branded it "the Internet on Cable."  My weekly column (Toronto Star version, homepage version, Ottawa Citizen version, Tyee version) notes that years later, their service, as well as those of their competitors, is gradually morphing into "the Internet as Cable" as broadcasters, Internet service providers, and cultural groups steadily move toward the delivery of content online that bears a striking resemblance to the conventional cable model.

While cable television has its virtues – some consumer choice, the ability to time shift programs by recording them with a VCR or PVR, and video on-demand offerings – it is largely premised on limited consumer control.  Cable distributors determine channel choices, geographic distribution, and commercial substitution (with input from the broadcast regulator), offer only limited interactivity, and quietly even possess the ability to stop consumers from recording some programs.

Until recently, the Internet was precisely the opposite, offering unlimited user choice, continuous interactivity, and technological capabilities to copy and remix content.  That is gradually changing as broadcasters seek to re-assert greater geographic control over their content, ISPs experiment with cable-like models for prioritized content delivery, and some creator groups lobby the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission to adapt Canadian content regulations to the Internet.

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November 7, 2007 Comments are Disabled Neutrality

How the Internet On Cable Became the Internet as Cable

When Rogers Communications began promoting its Rogers@Home high-speed Internet service nearly a decade ago, the company branded it "the Internet on Cable."  My weekly column (Toronto Star version, homepage version, Ottawa Citizen version, Tyee version) notes that years later, their service, as well as those of their competitors, is gradually morphing into "the Internet as Cable" as broadcasters, Internet service providers, and cultural groups steadily move toward the delivery of content online that bears a striking resemblance to the conventional cable model.

While cable television has its virtues – some consumer choice, the ability to time shift programs by recording them with a VCR or PVR, and video on-demand offerings – it is largely premised on limited consumer control.  Cable distributors determine channel choices, geographic distribution, and commercial substitution (with input from the broadcast regulator), offer only limited interactivity, and quietly even possess the ability to stop consumers from recording some programs.

Until recently, the Internet was precisely the opposite, offering unlimited user choice, continuous interactivity, and technological capabilities to copy and remix content.  That is gradually changing as broadcasters seek to re-assert greater geographic control over their content, ISPs experiment with cable-like models for prioritized content delivery, and some creator groups lobby the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission to adapt Canadian content regulations to the Internet.

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November 7, 2007 1 comment Columns

Bell and Traffic Shaping

Many people have written to note that new reports from P2Pnet, Ars Technica, and Technaute.com indicate that Bell has admitted that it is traffic shaping peer-to-peer applications such as BitTorrent.  I argued a couple of weeks ago that the starting point to address these issues is for far greater transparency […]

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November 7, 2007 Comments are Disabled Neutrality