Archive for January 14th, 2008

A New Copyright Pledge

As Members of Parliament prepare to return to Ottawa, some have responded to the thousands of letters sent last month out of concern for a Canadian DMCA.  While the responses vary by party (many are posted on the Facebook group), all generally note their concern with copyright balance and a […]

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January 14, 2008 Comments are Disabled Stop CDMCA

A New Copyright Pledge

As Members of Parliament prepare to return to Ottawa, some have responded to the thousands of letters sent last month out of concern for a Canadian DMCA.  While the responses vary by party (many are posted on the Facebook group), all generally note their concern with copyright balance and a […]

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January 14, 2008 11 comments News

When Free Access to Research is Mandated By Law

John Willinsky joins Slaw.ca with a column on open access.

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January 14, 2008 Comments are Disabled Must Reads

DMCA Used to Sue Over Bad Movie Review

This is what Jim Prentice wants for Canada?!

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January 14, 2008 5 comments Must Reads

Why Is There No Canadian MIT?

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) highlights the remarkable accomplishments on the MIT Open Courseware initiative, which today features nearly every course offered by the Institute – about 1800 in all.  More than 90 percent of MIT's faculty voluntarily participates in the program, offering not only their course materials, but also hundreds of audio and video podcasts.  The courses are published under open licences that encourage users to reuse, redistribute, and modify the materials for noncommercial purposes. The user base includes educators planning their own courses, students using the MIT materials to complement courses at their own institutions, and millions of self-learners who use the materials to enhance their personal knowledge.

What started with just MIT has grown into a consortium of dozens of universities from around the world that has published 5,000 courses in many different languages.  China leads the way with 30 universities.  In all, 160 universities and colleges from 20 countries, including Japan, Colombia, Vietnam, South Africa, and Saudi Arabia, have committed to publish at least ten courses in open courseware format so that the materials are freely available on a non-commercial basis.  I argue that the Open Courseware initiative is an exciting story of the potential of the Internet, of universities fulfilling their missions as educational leaders, and of the desire of educators around the globe to share their knowledge.

Yet it is also a story in which Canada is largely absent. 

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January 14, 2008 20 comments Columns