Archive for July 28th, 2009

BitTorrent Speaks: Correcting the Record in CRTC Net Neutrality Hearing

BitTorrent has shaken up the CRTC network management hearing with a late submission [no online link yet] that seeks to set the record straight on BitTorrent and its impact on ISP networks.  The company begins by noting:

Our company, more specifically our BitTorrent application, has been referred to repeatedly in various submissions in this proceeding.  From these submissions, there appears to be some misconceptions as to the effect of BitTorrent, as well as in general peer-to-peer (“P2P”)  applications, on the Internet and in fact there has been an overstatement of the effect of such
applications on network congestion.  

After describing BitTorrent (the company and the application), the submission addresses several misconceptions:

  • Shaw argued that the high number of connections with P2P subverts the fairness of TCP.  BitTorrent says this is incorrect, since very few connections (4 – 5) are used at any one time.
  • Rogers argued that users do not care about upload performances.  BitTorrent says this is inaccurate given the correlation between download and upload for BitTorrent users.
  • Cogeco argues that P2P is not a real-time or interactive application.  BitTorrent says this too is false since some apps like Skype are clearly interactive and some BitTorrent clients supports streaming.
  • Rogers argued that P2P can create 24/7 always on usage.  BitTorrent says this is exxagerated with the average client only active around 4 days per month.

BitTorrent then focuses on the effect of Canadian traffic management practices on the application's performance.  The two main paragraphs are worth quoting in full since they have major implications beyond just the CRTC as BitTorrent states that movie executives report that Canadian P2P usage has declined dramatically over the past year.  The comment:

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July 28, 2009 16 comments News

Transcripts for Vancouver and Calgary Copyright Consultations Posted Online

The Copyright Consultation website now features literal transcripts (and MP3 versions) of the first two roundtables held as part of the consultation.  The Vancouver roundtable included the following participants:

  • Richard Brownsey, British Columbia Film
  • Paul Whitney, Canadian Urban Library Council
  • Danielle Parr, Software Association of Canada
  • Mira Sundara Rajan, Canada Research Chair on Intellectual Property Law, UBC
  • Richard Rosenberg, BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association
  • Niina Mitter, British Columbia Library Association Copyright Committee
  • Elizabeth Rains, British Columbia Association of Magazine Publishers
  • Mary Henricksen, Arts and Culture Branch, Province of British Columbia
  • Lisa Codd, British Columbia Museum’s Association
  • Charles Lazer, Writer’s Guild of Canada
  • Bill Henderson, Songwriters Association of Canada
  • Margot Patterson, Canadian Association of Broadcasters
  • Stephen Ellis, CFTPA
  • Goef Glass, Vancouver Fair Copyright
  • Ian Boyko, Canadian Federation of Students

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July 28, 2009 4 comments News

The Return of Captain Copyright? CIPO Launches “Promoting Respect for IP Rights”

Longtime readers of this blog will recall Captain Copyright, the ill-fated Access Copyright copyright "education initiative" that was withdrawn in 2007 following intense criticism.  Copyright education initiatives have remained a focus of some rights groups, who believe that convincing kids of the value of copyright can lead to greater respect for copyright law.  In fact, in my earlier writing on copyright policy laundering, I noted that a consistent theme has been calls for the government to create and fund public education and awareness programs.

It now appears that the government is laying the foundation to do just that. The Canadian Intellectual Property Office, which falls under Industry Minister Tony Clement's mandate, has quietly launched a "Promoting Respect of Intellectual Property Rights" initiative that involves "exploring ways it can contribute more actively to promoting the respect of intellectual property rights." According to documents obtained from a source recently consulted by CIPO, it is starting the initiative by conducting a gap analysis to identify existing IPR respect promotion programs, key messages, and how CIPO might partner with these efforts.  The scope is described as follows:

CIPO's mission is to accelerate Canada's economic development by fostering the use of intellectual property systems and the exploitation of intellectual property (IP) information. The IP rights delivered by the Office enable its owner to profit from the creative endeavour. However, inventors and innovators will only avail themselves of the IP system if this value is respected, i.e., the greater the IPR is respected, the greater the value.

The focus for our IPR promotion work, we believe, will be on awareness-raising and educational programs highlighting the benefits to owners, economic development and Canadians at large, more so than the narrower concept of IPR enforcement. We define “respect of IPR” as: “Understanding what is IP, knowing of the existence of an IP right and affirmatively respecting that right.” 

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July 28, 2009 13 comments News

The Return of Captain Copyright? CIPO Launches “Promoting Respect for IP Rights”

Longtime readers of this blog will recall Captain Copyright, the ill-fated Access Copyright copyright "education initiative" that was withdrawn in 2007 following intense criticism.  Copyright education initiatives have remained a focus of some rights groups, who believe that convincing kids of the value of copyright can lead to greater respect for copyright law.  In fact, in my earlier writing on copyright policy laundering, I noted that a consistent theme has been calls for the government to create and fund public education and awareness programs.

It now appears that the government is laying the foundation to do just that. The Canadian Intellectual Property Office, which falls under Industry Minister Tony Clement's mandate, has quietly launched a "Promoting Respect of Intellectual Property Rights" initiative that involves "exploring ways it can contribute more actively to promoting the respect of intellectual property rights." According to documents obtained from a source recently consulted by CIPO, it is starting the initiative by conducting a gap analysis to identify existing IPR respect promotion programs, key messages, and how CIPO might partner with these efforts.  The scope is described as follows:

CIPO's mission is to accelerate Canada's economic development by fostering the use of intellectual property systems and the exploitation of intellectual property (IP) information. The IP rights delivered by the Office enable its owner to profit from the creative endeavour. However, inventors and innovators will only avail themselves of the IP system if this value is respected, i.e., the greater the IPR is respected, the greater the value.

The focus for our IPR promotion work, we believe, will be on awareness-raising and educational programs highlighting the benefits to owners, economic development and Canadians at large, more so than the narrower concept of IPR enforcement. We define “respect of IPR” as: “Understanding what is IP, knowing of the existence of an IP right and affirmatively respecting that right.” 

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July 28, 2009 Comments are Disabled Stop CDMCA

Angus: C-61 Was “Bulky, Unenforceable, and Ultimately Ridiculous”

NDP Digital Affairs critic Charlie Angus publishes an op-ed on the current copyright consultation and the potential "to get it right."

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July 28, 2009 2 comments Must Reads