Archive for May 4th, 2010

Ontario Court Sets Standard For Disclosing Anonymous Posters

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice has issued its appellate decision on whether the owners of the Free Dominion website can be ordered to disclose the identities of several anonymous posters accused of defamation. The original order covered email and IP addresses.  On appeal, the Canadian Civil Liberties Association and CIPPIC intervened to argue that the court should take free speech and privacy rights into consideration when assessing whether an order is appropriate.

Relying heavily on the Sony BMG v. Doe case (the file sharing lawsuit that CRIA now denies exists), the court notes that it "illustrates that a court must have regard to the privacy interests of anonymous users of the Internet before granting a Norwich Phramacal order, even where the issue involved pertains to property rights and does not engage the interest of freedom of expression." 

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May 4, 2010 5 comments News

The James Moore Hockey Tweet

As many will have heard, over the weekend Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore posted a tweet saying the Vancouver Canucks are Canada's team in the NHL playoffs.  Denis McGrath wrote a response titled Tweets Have Consequences, which I retweeted on Sunday night.  By Monday, the story took off, with national […]

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May 4, 2010 2 comments News

Assessing ACTA from an Australian Perspective

Kim Weatherall has posted a detailed section-by-section analysis of ACTA and its potential impact on Australian law.

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May 4, 2010 Comments are Disabled Must Reads

Dutch Report: File Sharers Biggest Customers

Ars Technica reports on a new Dutch study that finds that file sharers are the content industry's "largest customers."

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May 4, 2010 Comments are Disabled Must Reads