Archive for November, 2010

The U.S. Influence on Bill C-32 Hits House of Commons Debate

One of the most notable aspects of the House of Commons debate on Bill C-32 thus far (debate continues today) has been the recognition by opposition MPs of the influence of the U.S. on the bill’s digital lock rules.  In the opening debate, Bloc MP Carole Lavallée argued:

This bill was developed for the big American film and video game companies, and digital locks meet most of their needs. For these big American and European film and video game companies, the government did a good job.

That theme continued in day two of the debate in this exchange between the NDP and the Liberals:

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November 5, 2010 35 comments News

Opposition Responses to C-32’s Digital Lock Rules – The Video

Video clips from the opposition comments to Bill C-32’s digital locks (along with MP Scott Simms bringing a copy of From “Radical Extremism” to “Balanced Copyright”: Canadian Copyright and the Digital Agenda to the debate):

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November 5, 2010 6 comments News

UK To Review Copyright Flexibilities

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has announced plans to review his country’s copyright laws with the view to relax the law to allow greater use of copyright material without prior permission.  Cameron spoke of the benefits of fair use to help develop new products and services.

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November 5, 2010 1 comment Must Reads

Facing Up to the Generational Privacy Divide

Last week hundreds of privacy regulators, corporate officers, and activists gathered in Jerusalem, Israel for the annual Data Protection and Privacy Commissioner Conference.  My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes the conference theme focused on the perception of a growing privacy divide between generations, with older and younger demographics seemingly adopting sharply different views on the importance of privacy.  

Many acknowledged that longstanding privacy norms are being increasingly challenged by the massive popularity of social networks that encourage users to share information that in a previous generation would have never been made publicly available for all the world to see.  Moreover, rapid technological change and the continuous evolution of online sites and services create enormous difficulty for regulators unaccustomed to moving at Internet speed.

Given these changes, the conference asked participants to question whether privacy norms are at a breaking point with conventional laws, regulations, and principles rendered irrelevant in the face of the generational and technological shift.

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November 4, 2010 21 comments Columns

Facing Up to the Generational Privacy Divide

Appeared in the Toronto Star on October 31, 2010 as Facing Up to the Generational Privacy Divide Last week hundreds of privacy regulators, corporate officers, and activists gathered in Jerusalem, Israel for the annual Data Protection and Privacy Commissioner Conference. The conference theme focused on the perception of a growing […]

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November 4, 2010 1 comment Columns Archive