Archive for March 30th, 2011

GeistonUBB

GeistonUBB.pdf

Read more ›

March 30, 2011 Comments are Disabled General

Usage Based Billing Around the World: How Canada Stands Alone

When the usage based billing controversy grabbed national headlines last month, I posted several long pieces on the issue. My first post attempted to unpack the issue, focusing on the some the misleading claims about the supposed need for UBB at the wholesale level and putting the use of data caps in Canada in context.  Later posts discussed concerns with the CRTC approach on UBB, the claims regarding network congestion, and a piece on what should come next, including what the CRTC should do on wholesale UBB and the broader policy measures on foreign ownership restrictions, fostering greater competition, and addressing the retail UBB concerns. 

Those posts attracted some attention and soon afterward I was asked by Netflix if I was interested in digging deeper into these issues. The company provided some support so that I was able to quickly assemble a great team of students – Keith Rose, Peter Waldkirch, Tyler Nechiporenko, and Rachel Gold – to delve into issues such as congestion claims, comparative UBB approaches, the cost of transferring a GB of data, and some potential solutions. I completed the paper over the weekend and have posted it here. I’ll be posting on several elements over the next few days, concluding with my proposal for the establishment of a UBB equivalent for Internet Traffic Management Practices (ITMPs), which I’ve dubbed Internet Billing Usage Management Practices or IBUMPs.

This first post features a comparative look at usage based billing in other countries.

Read more ›

March 30, 2011 38 comments News

GeistUBBcomparative

geistubbcomparative.pdf

Read more ›

March 30, 2011 Comments are Disabled General

Rogers Faces More Questions on World of Warcraft Throttling

Teresa Murphy, who filed the original complaint against Rogers over its throttling of World of Warcraft, has submitted a detailed response to the Rogers response. It calls on Rogers to drop its throttling practices and reimburse subscribers for damages resulting from its practices.

Read more ›

March 30, 2011 5 comments Must Reads

Study Finds Open Access Increases Citation in Legal Scholarship By Over 50%

A new study from the University of Georgia finds that open access legal scholarship can expect to receive more than 50% more citations than non-open access legal writings.

Read more ›

March 30, 2011 3 comments Must Reads