Text: Small Text  Normal Text  Large Text  Larger Text

Blog Archive

SMTWTFS
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031
Michael Geist's Blog

The No iPod Tax Press Conference: An Alternative Script

Clement & Moore on iPod Tax

Earlier today I walked a few blocks from my office to Ottawa's Rideau Centre to attend a press conference with Industry Minister Tony Clement and Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore, who promised an important announcement.  The two ministers stood in front of an HMV and a group of students wearing t-shirts with No iPod tax logos on the back to declare that they were firmly set against a massive new tax on technology for all the holiday shoppers in the mall.  The Ministers claimed that all three opposition parties supported a tax of up to $75, which (reminiscent of the Dion "tax on everything" campaign) would apply to all technology devices and even cars.

The press conference suggests that opposition to extending the private copying levy may be the key positioning point for the government in support of Bill C-32.  Rather than focusing on the bill's actual provisions, the government will argue that the bill deserves support from the public because of what isn't there - the levy extension.  However, an alternate press conference might have featured the following script (the actual script is here):


Tags:
Share: Slashdot, Digg, Del.icio.us, Newsfeeder, Reddit, StumbleUpon, TwitterTagsShare
View
 

Australia Government Report Warns Against Including IP In Trade Agreements

The Australian Government's Productivity Commission, which is the government's independent research and advisory body on a range of economic, social and environmental issues affecting the welfare of Australians, has released a new report on the impact of bilateral and regional trade agreements.  The report, which contains some key lessons for Canada given our current trade negotiations activities with Europe, India, and South American countries, warns against the inclusion of intellectual property within these trade agreements.  The report concludes:

The Commission considers that Australia should not generally seek to include IP provisions in further BRTAs, and that any IP provisions that are proposed for a particular agreement should only be included after an economic assessment of the impacts, including on consumers, in Australia and partner countries. To safeguard against the prospect that acceptance of ‘negative sum game’ proposals, the assessment would need to find that implementing the provisions would likely generate overall net benefits for members of the agreement.


Tags:
Share: Slashdot, Digg, Del.icio.us, Newsfeeder, Reddit, StumbleUpon, TwitterTagsShare
View
 

Rogers Admits New Net Throttling, Slow to Disclose to the Public

Rogers has been hit with a complaint about its throttling practices but has been very slow amend its public disclosure documents as required by the CRTC.  Complaints began appearing online earlier this fall, with users noting that Rogers was degrading P2P uploads and downloads.  Torrent Freak details what happened next - a complaint to the CRTC, an attempt to downplay the issue, and finally an acknowledgement that the traffic management requires a change in publicly disclosed policy.

Tags:
Share: Slashdot, Digg, Del.icio.us, Newsfeeder, Reddit, StumbleUpon, TwitterTagsShare
 

CRTC Issues Call for Comments on Digital TV Transition

The CRTC has issued a call for comments on the regulations associated with the digital television transition. The regulations include required public service announcements and information posted on broadcaster websites.  The transition is currently set for August 31, 2011.  The deadline for comments is January 11, 2011.
Tags:
Share: Slashdot, Digg, Del.icio.us, Newsfeeder, Reddit, StumbleUpon, TwitterTagsShare