Post Tagged with: "amazon"

London anti-Uber taxi protest June 11 2014 035 by David Holt (CC BY-SA 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/nWtp1Z

Uber Battle the Latest Chapter in the Internet’s Never-Ending Story

For the past two decades, it has been the Internet’s never-ending story. Established, successful businesses face Internet upstarts who leverage the advantages of a global network and new communications technology to offer better prices, more choice or innovative services.

In the 1990s, it was online retailers such as Amazon, who presented more selection at lower prices than most bookstores could offer. In the 2000s, Wikipedia brought the decades-old encyclopedia business to an end, online music services provided greater convenience than conventional record stores, and Internet telephony technologies used by companies like Skype changed the rules of international voice and video calls. Today, services such as Uber, AirBnB, and Netflix have upended the taxi, hotel, and broadcast worlds.

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes that in these David vs. Goliath type battles, the established businesses don’t quietly fade away. Using their remaining influence, they often look to laws and regulations that increase costs, prohibit activities, restrict consumers, or regulate pricing to create barriers for the new entrants.

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July 13, 2015 11 comments Columns

“The best way in the history of mankind for a writer to earn money”

Author Joe Konrath, who is earning $3,500 per day from selling e-books on Amazon, highlights the benefits of self-publishing.

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January 13, 2012 4 comments Must Reads

Search Engine Focuses on Amazon One-Click Patent

Jesse Brown’s Search Engine focuses on the Amazon one-click patent case, which heads to the Federal Court of Appeal this week. Jeremy Morris, a terrific post-doc at the University of Ottawa, provides the analysis.

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June 21, 2011 Comments are Disabled Must Reads

Canadian Rules Rain on Cloud Music Parade: Why New Services Unlikely To Come To Canada Anytime Soon

Apple has once again captured the attention of the Internet world with the unveiling of the iCloud, an online backup system that will allow users to instantly store their content on Apple computer servers so that they can be accessed anywhere from any device.

The most notable element of the iCloud is the iTunes Match service that gives users cloud-based access to their full digital music libraries. This includes songs purchased on iTunes as well as any other music files, which will be identified by Apple and made available without the need to upload the copy. Itunes Match has obtained the blessing of the major record labels, who will reportedly receive the lion’s share of the service’s US$24.95 annual fee.

The Apple announcement comes on the heels of newly launched music cloud services from Internet giants Amazon and Google. The Amazon Cloud Player allow users to upload their own music to Amazon’s computer servers and to stream it to any device, while Music Beta by Google similarly involves uploading music files for streaming access. Neither Amazon nor Google obtained licenses for their services, relying instead on their users’ fair use rights to shift their music to the “cloud.”

While the licensing approaches differentiate Apple from its competitors, my weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) argues all three cloud music services share a common characteristic when it comes to Canada – none are likely to be available here anytime soon.

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June 14, 2011 69 comments Columns

Federal Court Open Door to Business Method Patents

The Federal Court of Canada has overruled the Patent Appeal Board in concluding that business method patents can be approved in appropriate circumstances.  Coverage from the Globe and QMI.  I wrote about the issue last year.

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October 15, 2010 5 comments Must Reads