Post Tagged with: "domain names"

Why I’m Running for a Place on the CIRA Board

Earlier this year, I wrote a column and post about proposed governance changes to the Canadian Internet Registration Authority in which I expressed concern that the plans would remove the ability for CIRA members to nominate their own candidates to the board. The Board decided to hold off on the […]

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August 24, 2012 24 comments News

Internet Domain Name Land Grab More Than Just “Fools Gold”

Last week, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the California-based non-profit corporation charged with the principal responsibility for maintaining the Internet’s domain name system, revealed that it has received nearly 2,000 applications for new domain name extensions. While many applications may be abandoned or face objections that stall their approval, my weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes it seems certain that there will be hundreds of new domain name extensions in the not-too-distant future, a change that will fundamentally reshape the way we think about domain names.

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June 21, 2012 6 comments Columns

Internet Domain Name Land Grab More Than Just “Fools Gold”

gtld expansion Appeared in the Toronto Star on June 17, 2012 as Internet Domain Name Land Grab More Than Just “Fools Gold” Last week, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the California-based non-profit corporation charged with the principal responsibility for maintaining the Internet’s domain name system, revealed […]

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June 21, 2012 Comments are Disabled Columns Archive

ICANN Releases List of New TLD Applications

ICANN has released the list of nearly two thousand new top-level-domain applications.  Canadian applications include the Canadian Real Estate Association applying for .mls, Rogers applying for .chatr, .rogers. and .fido, and a new group seeking .quebec.  

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June 13, 2012 6 comments Must Reads

All Your Internets Belong to US, Continued: The Bodog.com Case

Imagine a scenario in which a country enacts a law that bans the sale of asbestos and includes the power to seize the assets of any company selling the product anywhere in the world. The country tests the law by obtaining a court order to seize key assets of a Canadian company, whose operations with hundreds of employees takes a major hit. The Canadian government is outraged, promising to support the company in its efforts to restore its operations.

That is the opening of my technology law column this week (Toronto Star version, homepage version) which continues by noting this scenario became reality last week, though the product was not asbestos and the Canadian government has yet to respond. The case involves Bodog.com, a Canadian-owned online sports gaming site and the country doing the seizing was the United States. Supporting online gaming operations will undoubtedly make governments somewhat squeamish, but the broader implications of last week’s seizure touch on millions of websites and Internet companies who now find themselves subject to U.S. jurisdiction.

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March 6, 2012 30 comments Columns