Post Tagged with: "indu"

Toronto: book stacks at Toronto Reference Library by The City of Toronto (CC BY 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/gjDrZY

Canadian Publisher on the Term of Copyright: Life Plus 50 Years is “Already Too Long”

Broadview Press, an independent Canadian publisher with hundreds of books in print, has called on the government to ensure that there is no extension from the current term of life of the author plus 50 years. I previously noted the Broadview Press submission in a post on the tiny impact of reduced royalties from Access Copyright. The submission also focuses on copyright term:

Another vitally important copyright issue that has been on the table in recent TTP and NAFTA trade negotiations is the international pressure Canada is faced with to increase the length of the copyright term from 50 years after the death of the author (already too long, in our opinion) to a full 70 years after the death of the author, thereby preventing for an additional generation the publication of competing editions of literary classics—editions that can often be of immense cultural and pedagogical value.

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May 7, 2018 15 comments News
The Hockey Sweater: 30th Anniversary Edition by Tundra Books (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/nKeNYM

Less Than 1%: Canadian Publisher Data Points to Tiny Impact of Access Copyright Royalty Decline

Last week, the Association of Canadian Publishers appeared before the Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology as part of the copyright review. The ACP, which commissioned a study last year that pointed to digital trends in publishing in Canada that did not identify copyright as key a concern, has been a prominent voice on the impact of declining revenues from Access Copyright licence. Yet as David Lametti, the Parliamentary Secretary for the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development noted during questioning, data submitted by two ACP members to the committee suggest that the Access Copyright royalties have had little impact on overall publisher revenues.

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May 1, 2018 11 comments News
All Rights Reserved* by Paul Gallo (CC BY 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/6zMVmm

Quebec Writers Group Calls for an End to Copyright Exceptions: “Only Where Access is Otherwise Impossible”

The Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology continues its year-long review of copyright this week with a mix of witnesses from education, libraries, writers, and publishers.  The Union des écrivaines et des écrivains québécois (UNEQ), which represents Quebec-based writers, appeared yesterday and submitted a brief to the committee with its key recommendations. There are several that will attract attention, including increased damages and an expansion of the private copying levy to cover e-readers, hard drives, and USB keys (a recommendation that may stem from a misunderstanding of the levy which is only for music). However, the most troubling is how the group takes aim at copyright user’s rights.

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April 25, 2018 5 comments News
Mobile spam by Christiaan Colen (CC BY-SA 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/yAjx4d

Government Response Suggests No Appetite for Canadian Anti-Spam Law Reform

The government released its response to the House of Commons study on Canada’s anti-spam law this week and while one report suggested that reforms are coming, the reality is that there appears to be little appetite for significant change. I wrote about the law’s effectiveness and appeared before the committee as part of the study.  The committee report stopped short of calling for an anti-spam law overhaul, instead recommending clarifications of several provisions in the law.

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April 20, 2018 5 comments News
105-IMG_0002-OTSummitt2017-6x9 by BCcampus_News (CC BY-NC 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/VjyUdx

Digital Trends and Initiatives in Education: The Study the Association of Canadian Publishers Tried To Bury

The Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology starts its year-long review of copyright today with the first of several hearings focused on copyright, education and fair dealing. The hearings begin with evidence from education groups to be followed by publishers and other rights holder representatives (sources indicate that Access Copyright declined an invitation but will presumably return at a later date). The Association of Canadian Publishers, the leading national publisher lobby, has been one of the most vocal groups on copyright and will likely appear to tell MPs that fair dealing should be narrowed.

While the ACP has not hesitated to speak out at industry events, it interestingly has said nothing about a study it commissioned on digital trends and initiatives in education in Canada. The ACP study, which received financial support from the Government of Canada and the Ontario Media Development Corporation, is not posted on the publicly available portion of its website. There was no press release when it was released last June and I can find no public reference to it anywhere on the site. Jean Dryden pointed out to me that the study is available through the OMDC.

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April 17, 2018 11 comments News