Post Tagged with: "oer"

UNESCO’s 2012 Paris OER Declaration

UNESCO held the World Open Educational Resources Congress in Paris last week with delegates releasing a declaration in support of OERs and open licensing frameworks.

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June 28, 2012 Comments are Disabled Must Reads

The Future of Education Is Here, It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed

  William Gibson, the American-Canadian science fiction writer who coined the term cyberspace, is well-known for having stated “the future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed.” The quote succinctly points to the gradual dissemination of new technologies that start with first adopters but can take years to spread more widely.

To borrow from Gibson, in recent weeks it has become increasingly clear that the future of education is here, though it is not evenly distributed. My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes the emerging model flips the current approach of expensive textbooks, closed research, and limited access to classroom-based learning on its head, instead featuring open course materials, open access to scholarly research, and Internet-based courses that can simultaneously accommodate thousands of students. The concern is that other countries are becoming first adopters, while Canada lags behind.

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May 18, 2012 7 comments Columns

The Future of Education Is Here, It’s Just Not Evenly Distributed

Appeared in the Toronto Star on May 13, 2012 as Is Canada Lagging Behind in Online Education? William Gibson, the American-Canadian science fiction writer who coined the term cyberspace, is well-known for having stated “the future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed.” The quote succinctly points to […]

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May 18, 2012 Comments are Disabled Columns Archive

U.S. Government Funding For Open Education Materials a “Game Changer”

The technology community is fond of referring to announcements that fundamentally alter a sector or service as a “game changer”. Recent examples include the debut of the Apple iTunes store in 2003, which demonstrated how a digital music service that responds to consumer demands was possible, and Google’s Gmail, which upended web-based email in 2004 by offering 1 gigabyte of storage when competitors like Microsoft’s Hotmail were providing a paltry 2 megabytes.

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) recently covered the U.S. government announcement of its own game changer, though it attracted far less attention than iTunes or Gmail. Led by the Departments of Labor and Education, it committed US$2 billion toward a new program to create free online teaching and course materials for post-secondary programs of two years or less.

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March 9, 2011 24 comments Columns

U.S. Government Funding For Open Education Materials a “Game Changer”

Appeared on February 27, 2011 in the Toronto Star as U.S. digital project signals the rise of versatile e-textbooks The technology community is fond of referring to announcements that fundamentally alter a sector or service as a “game changer”. Recent examples include the debut of the Apple iTunes store in […]

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March 9, 2011 Comments are Disabled Columns Archive