Post Tagged with: "term extension"

U.S. Copyright Lobby Takes Aim at Canadian Copyright Term Through Trans-Pacific Partnership

The U.S. copyright lobby, led by the International Intellectual Property Alliance, appeared last week before a U.S. Congressional Committee hearing on the Trans-Pacific Partnership and made it clear that it wants the U.S. to use the trade agreement to force Canada to extend the term of copyright.  Canadian copyright law is currently at life of the author plus 50 years, which meets the international standard found in the Berne Convention. The U.S. extended its copyright term years ago to life of the author plus 70 years under pressure from the Disney Corporation (Mickey Mouse was headed to the public domain) and has since pushed other countries to do the same.

The IIPA says that the TPP should require all members to extend their term of copyright (Japan and New Zealand are also at life plus 50 years), which it claims is needed to “maintain incentives for investment in the conservation and dissemination of older works.” Yet a recent study found the opposite with far more public domain books available commercially than books still subject to copyright.

When the Canadian government conducted a consultation on participation in the TPP, copyright was the top issue raised with many focusing on concerns associated with term extension. As I wrote last year, it is worth noting the many important authors who would be immediately affected since their works are scheduled to become public domain in the 2013 – 2033 period.

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August 7, 2013 17 comments News

Deadline Day To Speak Out on TPP’s Copyright Term Extension

While many will be focused on the return of lawful access, today is also the deadline for submissions to the government’s public consultation on Canadian entry into the Trans Pacific Partnership negotiations. As I noted in earlier posts (here, here, here, and here), the TPP would have enormous implications for Canadian copyright law – the Globe’s John Ibbitson described as surrendering Canadian copyright sovereignty – as it would require stricter digital lock rules, extend the term of copyright, and mandate new Internet provider liability provisions. 

I’ve posted my submission, which includes comments on the lack of transparency with the TPP negotiations, digital locks, Internet provider liability, and copyright term, below. Another submission focused on the public domain comes from Dr. Mark Akrigg, Founder, Project Gutenberg Canada.

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February 14, 2012 3 comments News

The Cost of Copyright Term Extension

Last week, the European Council passed copyright term extension for sound recordings, extending the term from 50 to 70 years. Martin Kretschmer, a UK professor, notes that the cost of the extension will exceed one billion euros to the general public. Seventy-two percent of the revenues will go to record […]

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September 19, 2011 3 comments Must Reads

Submissions on Canada-EU Trade Deal: Canadian Publishers’ Council Seek Term Extension, Database Rt

Concluding the review of submissions to DFAIT regarding the Canada-EU Trade Agreement, the submission of the Canadian Publishers' Council is important because it highlights the hopes of those lobbying for extensive new copyright reforms.  The submission makes clear that those groups hope that CETA could force Canada into reforms such […]

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January 21, 2010 26 comments News

EU Demands for Trade Deal Would Reshape Canadian IP Law

More than 20 years ago, Canada negotiated a free trade agreement with the United States that attracted enormous public attention.  The first FTA – to be followed a few years later by the North American Free Trade Agreement that brought Mexico into the mix – played a pivotal role in a national election and ultimately resulted in dramatic changes to the economy and Canadian law.

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes that earlier this year, Canada and the European Union announced plans to negotiate a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), possibly the biggest Canadian trade negotiations since NAFTA.  The first round of talks took place in Ottawa in October, yet the treaty has generated practically no public scrutiny. That may change following the leak last week of the European Union's proposed intellectual property chapter.

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December 21, 2009 18 comments Columns