Archive for December, 2013

The Letters of the Law: The Year in Tech Law and Policy

With Edward Snowden and the great wireless war of 2013 leading the way, law and technology issues garnered headlines all year long. My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) takes a look back at 2013 from A to Z:

A is for Americangirl.ca, a Canadian domain name that was the subject of two dispute claims in 2013. The popular doll company relied on a quirk in the policy that permitted a follow-up complaint after its first case was rejected.

B is for Bell TV, which a federal court ordered to pay $20,000 for violating the privacy of a customer. The case arose when Bell TV surreptitiously obtained permission to run a credit check by including it as a term in its rental agreement without telling the customer.

C is for the Competition Bureau of Canada, which launched an investigation into alleged anti-competitive practices by search giant Google.

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December 29, 2013 3 comments Columns

The Letters of the Law: The Year in Tech Law and Policy

Appeared in the Toronto Star on Saturday, December 21, 2013 as Letters of The Law: The Year in Tech Law and Policy With Edward Snowden and the great wireless war of 2013 leading the way, law and technology issues garnered headlines all year long. A look back at 2013 from […]

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December 29, 2013 Comments are Disabled Columns Archive

Supreme Court of Canada Emphasizes Balance in Determining Copyright Scope of Protection

The Supreme Court of Canada issued another copyright decision this morning, ruling in favour of Claude Robinson in a longstanding copyright infringement battle over a children’s television series. Robinson was vindicated in the decision with an award of millions of dollars. The case is an important one for determining whether […]

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December 23, 2013 46 comments News

isohuntupdatedclaim

isohuntupdateclaim.pdf

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December 22, 2013 Comments are Disabled General

Copyright Collectives Gone Mad: How the ERCC Spent Dollars to Earn Pennies

Howard Knopf points to an interesting Copyright Board of Canada decision that provides a instructive lesson in how copyright collectives fail. At issue is the Educational Rights Collective Canada, a collective formed in 1998 to collect royalties for educational copying of broadcast programs in classrooms. The ERCC, which includes the […]

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December 20, 2013 7 comments News