Chapters

The Copyright Pentalogy Book: An Open Access Success Story

The Copyright Pentalogy Book: An Open Access Success Story

Readers of this blog will know that earlier this year the University of Ottawa Press published The Copyright Pentalogy: How the Supreme Court of Canada Shook the Foundations of Canadian Copyright Law, an effort by many of Canada’s leading copyright scholars to begin the process of examining the long-term implications […]

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October 25, 2013 2 comments Books, Chapters, News
The Copyright Pentalogy: How the Supreme Court of Canada Shook the Foundations of Canadian Copyright

The Copyright Pentalogy: How the Supreme Court of Canada Shook the Foundations of Canadian Copyright

Copyright cases typically only reach the Supreme Court of Canada once every few years, ensuring that each case is carefully parsed and analyzed. As readers of this blog know, on July 12, 2012, the Supreme Court issued rulings on five copyright cases in a single day, an unprecedented tally that shook the very foundations of copyright law in Canada.  In fact, with the decisions coming just weeks after the Canadian government passed long-awaited copyright reform legislation, Canadian copyright law experienced a seismic shift that will take years to sort out.

I am delighted to report that this week the University of Ottawa Press published The Copyright Pentalogy: How the Supreme Court of Canada Shook the Foundations of Canadian Copyright Law, an effort by many of Canada’s leading copyright scholars to begin the process of examining the long-term implications of the copyright pentalogy. The book is available for purchase and is also available as a free download under a Creative Commons licence. The book can be downloaded in its entirety or each of the 14 chapters can be downloaded individually. This is the first of a new collection from the UOP on law, technology and society (I am pleased to serve as the collection editor) that will be part of the UOP’s open access collection.

This book features fourteen articles on copyright written by independent scholars from coast to coast. The diversity of contributors provides a rich view the copyright pentalogy, with analysis of the standard of review of copyright decisions, fair dealing, technological neutrality, the scope of copyright law, and the implications of the decisions for copyright collective management.

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May 2, 2013 12 comments Books, Chapters, News

Confronting The Social Media Regulatory Challenge

I presented on Confronting the Social Media Regulatory Challenge at the the International Telecommunications Union’s 11th Global Symposium for Regulators. The presentation and discussion paper are available for free online. 

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September 23, 2011 Comments are Disabled Chapters, Conferences
Canada’s Digital Economy Strategy: An Openness Framework

Canada’s Digital Economy Strategy: An Openness Framework

My chapter in The Internet Tree : The State of Telecom Policy in Canada 3.0 focuses on the need for openess in Canada’s digital strategy. I discuss Canada’s digital economy and strategy. Canada can implement an openess principle and frankly it makes sense. The possibilities I identified include  increased government transparency, open access […]

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June 29, 2011 Comments are Disabled Chapters

The Case for Flexibility in Implementing the WIPO Internet Treaties

Over the next few weeks, I’ll be placing the spotlight on the many contributions in From “Radical Extremism” to “Balanced Copyright”: Canadian Copyright and the Digital Agenda.   My substantive contribution focuses on the legal requirements to comply with the World Intellectual Property Organization’s Internet treaties. With the treaties dating back to the 1990s the issue may seem dated, yet it still resonates today. Within a domestic context, the government has identified ratification of the WIPO Internet treaties as one of Bill C-32′s chief goals.  Internationally, the 1990s WIPO debate was re-enacted this year during the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement negotiations, with the U.S. again failing to convince its negotiating partners to adopt its implementation approach for anti-circumvention.

My article examines the issue from four perspectives: the plain language of the statutory requirements, the legislative history behind the inclusion of anti-circumvention provisions within the treaty, state practice in implementing those requirements, and scholarly analysis of the treaty obligations.

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October 20, 2010 3 comments Chapters, News