Post Tagged with: "carrie"

“Made in Canada Copyright”

Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry Colin Carrie repeats the line again and again during Question Period.

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June 14, 2008 2 comments Must Reads

The Copyright MPs

Industry Minister Jim Prentice has understandably been the focal point of the Canadian DMCA given that it is his bill and his call as to whether the government will proceed with anti-education, anti-consumer, and anti-business copyright legislation.  While every MP should be paying close attention to copyright – anecdotal evidence suggests that the majority of MPs from all parties have heard from constituents about the issue – there is a subset that should be particularly concerned. 

The Copyright MPs are a group of 27 MPs (nine percent of all MPs) who share two key attributes – they won their riding by 10 percent or less in the last election and their riding is home to a university.  The combination is important since it is these MPs – not the very safe Jim Prentice – who will face the consequences of the Prentice bill that will harm a generation well versed in digital technologies, social networks, and the Internet.  In some ridings, less than 1,000 votes – roughly the size of some large first year courses – is needed to swing the entire riding.  In all, there are 10 Conservatives, 11 Liberals, 4 NDP, and 2 Bloc.  Who are the Copyright MPs?

The ten Conservative Copyright MPs who will be on the hotseat are:

MP Riding University Winning Percentage Runner Up Party
Rahim Jaffer (C) Edmonton-Strathcona U of Alberta 9.2 percent NDP
Dean Del Mastro (C) Peterborough Trent 3.6 percent Liberal
James Lunney (C) Nanaimo-Alberni Malaspina 9.1 percent NDP
Rod Bruinooge (C) Winnipeg South U of Manitoba 0.2 percent Liberal
David Sweet (C) Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough McMaster 4.6 percent Liberal
Norman Doyle (C) St. John's East Memorial 10.5 percent Liberal
Peter MacKay (C) Central Nova St. FX 7.8 percent NDP
Colin Carrie (C) Oshawa UOIT 5.2 percent NDP
Betty Hinton (C) Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo Thompson Rivers 8.5 percent NDP
Joe Comuzzi (L) Thunder Bay-Superior North Lakehead 1.0 percent NDP

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January 23, 2008 19 comments News

The Copyright MPs

Industry Minister Jim Prentice has understandably been the focal point of the Canadian DMCA given that it is his bill and his call as to whether the government will proceed with anti-education, anti-consumer, and anti-business copyright legislation.  While every MP should be paying close attention to copyright – anecdotal evidence suggests that the majority of MPs from all parties have heard from constituents about the issue – there is a subset that should be particularly concerned. 

The Copyright MPs are a group of 27 MPs (nine percent of all MPs) who share two key attributes – they won their riding by 10 percent or less in the last election and their riding is home to a university.  The combination is important since it is these MPs – not the very safe Jim Prentice – who will face the consequences of the Prentice bill that will harm a generation well versed in digital technologies, social networks, and the Internet.  In some ridings, less than 1,000 votes – roughly the size of some large first year courses – is needed to swing the entire riding.  In all, there are 10 Conservatives, 11 Liberals, 4 NDP, and 2 Bloc.  Who are the Copyright MPs?

The ten Conservative Copyright MPs who will be on the hotseat are:

MP Riding University Winning Percentage Runner Up Party
Rahim Jaffer (C) Edmonton-Strathcona U of Alberta 9.2 percent NDP
Dean Del Mastro (C) Peterborough Trent 3.6 percent Liberal
James Lunney (C) Nanaimo-Alberni Malaspina 9.1 percent NDP
Rod Bruinooge (C) Winnipeg South U of Manitoba 0.2 percent Liberal
David Sweet (C) Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough McMaster 4.6 percent Liberal
Norman Doyle (C) St. John's East Memorial 10.5 percent Liberal
Peter MacKay (C) Central Nova St. FX 7.8 percent NDP
Colin Carrie (C) Oshawa UOIT 5.2 percent NDP
Betty Hinton (C) Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo Thompson Rivers 8.5 percent NDP
Joe Comuzzi (L) Thunder Bay-Superior North Lakehead 1.0 percent NDP

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January 23, 2008 Comments are Disabled Stop CDMCA

The Copyright MPs

Industry Minister Jim Prentice has understandably been the focal point of the Canadian DMCA given that it is his bill and his call as to whether the government will proceed with anti-education, anti-consumer, and anti-business copyright legislation.  While every MP should be paying close attention to copyright – anecdotal evidence suggests that the majority of MPs from all parties have heard from constituents about the issue – there is a subset that should be particularly concerned. 

The Copyright MPs are a group of 27 MPs (nine percent of all MPs) who share two key attributes – they won their riding by 10 percent or less in the last election and their riding is home to a university.  The combination is important since it is these MPs – not the very safe Jim Prentice – who will face the consequences of the Prentice bill that will harm a generation well versed in digital technologies, social networks, and the Internet.  In some ridings, less than 1,000 votes – roughly the size of some large first year courses – is needed to swing the entire riding.  In all, there are 10 Conservatives, 11 Liberals, 4 NDP, and 2 Bloc.  Who are the Copyright MPs?

The ten Conservative Copyright MPs who will be on the hotseat are:

MP Riding University Winning Percentage Runner Up Party
Rahim Jaffer (C) Edmonton-Strathcona U of Alberta 9.2 percent NDP
Dean Del Mastro (C) Peterborough Trent 3.6 percent Liberal
James Lunney (C) Nanaimo-Alberni Malaspina 9.1 percent NDP
Rod Bruinooge (C) Winnipeg South U of Manitoba 0.2 percent Liberal
David Sweet (C) Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough McMaster 4.6 percent Liberal
Norman Doyle (C) St. John's East Memorial 10.5 percent Liberal
Peter MacKay (C) Central Nova St. FX 7.8 percent NDP
Colin Carrie (C) Oshawa UOIT 5.2 percent NDP
Betty Hinton (C) Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo Thompson Rivers 8.5 percent NDP
Joe Comuzzi (L) Thunder Bay-Superior North Lakehead 1.0 percent NDP

Read more ›

January 23, 2008 Comments are Disabled Stop CDMCA