Post Tagged with: "irwin book"

The Art of Selling Chocolate: Remarks on Copyright’s Domain

IP Osgoode posts on University of Toronto law professor Abraham Drassinower’s contribution to From “Radical Extremism” to “Balanced Copyright”: Canadian Copyright and the Digital Agenda his article The Art of Selling Chocolate: Remarks on Copyright’s Domain. The article features an exhaustive analysis of Justice Michel Bastrache’s opinion in the Euro-Excellence […]

Read more ›

October 27, 2010 Comments are Disabled Must Reads

Wire Report on Radical Extremism to Balanced Copyright Book

The Wire Report features a story, including a question and answer transcript of an interview with me, on From “Radical Extremism” to “Balanced Copyright”: Canadian Copyright and the Digital Agenda.

Read more ›

October 27, 2010 Comments are Disabled Must Reads

Enabling Access to Public Sector Information

Last week’s focus on open access, including the Liberal commitment to open government, brings to mind key issues involving access to public sector information.  My colleague Elizabeth Judge tackles the issue in her chapter in From “Radical Extremism” to “Balanced Copyright”: Canadian Copyright and the Digital Agenda. Judge provides a […]

Read more ›

October 26, 2010 6 comments News

Copyright the Canadian Way

This week’s Hill Times features an op-ed by Sara Bannerman that explores the Canadian history of fighting for independent copyright policies.  Bannerman notes that Bill C-32 “is more like a Canadian version of the American Digital Millennium Copyright Act than a made-in-Canada solution to copyright in the digital age.” Bannerman’s piece is adapted from her chapter in From “Radical Extremism” to “Balanced Copyright”: Canadian Copyright and the Digital Agenda and is one of several pieces that provide much-needed historical context to the current round of reforms.

Bannerman’s article notes that virtually from the moment of confederation, Canada has grappled with contentious copyright reform issues.  Reform efforts have invariably come as a response to international pressures, with the United Kingdom exerting significant influence over the early attempts to craft a genuine made-in-Canada copyright law.  Bannerman also places the spotlight on the challenges Canada has faced with international copyright treaties, with attitudes that have ranged from outright rejection to strong support.

Read more ›

October 25, 2010 7 comments News

Locking Out Lawful Users

Osgoode Hall Law School professor Carys Craig has a great post at the IP Osgoode site on her article in From “Radical Extremism” to “Balanced Copyright”: Canadian Copyright and the Digital Agenda, the copyright book from Irwin Law that officially launches tomorrow. Craig’s article focuses on two key aspects of Bill C-32: the fair dealing reforms and the impact of the digital lock provisions.  On fair dealing, Craig brings much-needed perspective to the fair dealing reform, which has been the target of an ongoing fear mongering campaign that implausibly and inaccurately claims that it will erode Canadian culture.  Rather, Craig notes:

Educational, parodic and other transformative uses have long been recognized as potential fair uses in the United States. Indeed, the need to expressly include these specific exceptions in Canada speaks more to the shortcomings of the Canadian approach to fair dealing (in contrast to US fair use) than it does to the pursuit of a genuine balance between owners and users in the copyright reform process.

Craig reserves her harshest criticism for C-32’s digital lock provisions, which she describes as “unduly expansive,” concluding:

Read more ›

October 13, 2010 31 comments News