Post Tagged with: "piac"

boycott by Martin Abegglen (CC BY-SA 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/4L7rjh

Boycott: What If The CRTC Launched a Consumer Internet Code and Consumer Groups Refused to Participate in its Development?

Last month, the CRTC announced plans to create an Internet Code of Conduct. The CRTC promised that the code would establish “consumer friendly business practices, provide consumers with easy-to-understand contracts, ensure consumers have tools to avoid bill shock, and make it easier for consumers to switch providers.” The code attracted some initial criticism due to the wide range of exclusions – everything from net neutrality to privacy to broadband speeds falls outside its scope – but in recent days an even bigger concern has emerged with several leading Canadian consumer groups actively boycotting the proceeding.

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December 4, 2018 6 comments News

PIAC Calls For Better Disclosure on Internet Speeds

The Public Interest Advocacy Centre has issued a report that concludes that Canadian ISPs need to provide better disclosure about Internet speed and performance claims.

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January 24, 2013 5 comments Must Reads

PIAC Report Says Bill C-12 Data Breach Rules Should Be Toughened

PIAC has released a new report that examines the mandatory data breach reporting requirements in Bill C-12 and concludes that changes are needed to provide adequate privacy protection.

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January 10, 2012 Comments are Disabled Must Reads

The Daily Digital Lock Dissenter, Day 34: Public Interest Advocacy Centre

The Public Interest Advocacy Centre has been one of Canada’s leading consumer rights organizations, representing the public interest on consumer issues concerning telecommunications, energy, privacy, the information highway, electronic commerce, financial services, broadcasting, and competition law. PIAC submitted comments to the national copyright consultation that included the following on digital locks:

Consumers enjoy certain rights to use content without infringing copyright. The presence of technological measures doesn’t change that, and neither should anti-circumvention laws. Consumers must be able to circumvent technological measures, like DRM, providing that their access to the underlying content does not infringe copyright. These consumer rights fulfil important public policy goals, preserving consumer welfare, free speech, and innovation. The use of technological measures already threatens these values. Anti-circumvention laws shouldn’t statutorily undermine them as well.

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November 21, 2011 1 comment News

PIAC on Canadian Telecom Reform

The Public Interest Advocacy Centre has published a 218 page report on Canadian telecom regulation, arguing that reform is needed to address consumer concerns.

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January 5, 2011 3 comments Must Reads