Post Tagged with: "twitter"

President Trump Signs an Executive Order on Preventing Online Censorship by the White House (Shealah Craighead) https://flic.kr/p/2j6Pv4b Public Domain

The LawBytes Podcast, Episode 54: Eric Goldman on Internet Platform Liability and the Trump Executive Order

The U.S. approach to Internet platform liability has been characterized as the single most important legal protection for free speech on the Internet. Over the past two decades, every major Internet service has turned to the rules to ensure that liability for third party content posted on their sites rests with the poster, not the site or service. Those rules have proven increasingly controversial, however, with mounting calls for the companies to take on greater responsibility for content posted on their sites. The issue captured international attention last month when U.S. President Donald Trump issued an Executive Order that heightens the pressure for change.

Eric Goldman is a Professor of Law at Santa Clara University School of Law in the Silicon Valley where he co-directs the High Tech Law Institute. He has written extensively about Internet liability and appeared before the US Congress to testify on the issue. He joins me on the podcast to discuss the history behind the U.S. approach, its impact, and the implications of the Trump Executive Order.

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June 8, 2020 0 comments Podcasts
Trump tweet, May 29. 2020 https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1266231100780744704?s=20

Why the USMCA Locks in the Internet Platform Liability System in the U.S., Canada and Mexico

U.S. President Donald Trump yesterday signed an executive order targeting Internet platforms after Twitter fact-checked one of his tweets on mail-in voting (the company followed up with a warning on another tweet earlier today involving glorifying violence). The order cannot simply reverse current U.S. law, but it encourages U.S. regulators to rethink how the Internet safe harbour provisions that limit liability for Internet platforms for third party content are implemented.

While the U.S. is obviously free to assess its statutory approach, one issue that received little attention is that the U.S. has effectively locked itself into the safe harbour system through its trade agreement with Canada and Mexico. The inclusion of safe harbour provisions in the agreement were viewed by some as an attempt to force Canada to adopt similar rules, yet the more likely reason for lobbying on the issue was to ensure that the U.S. itself was bound by the rules. Indeed, there were last minute efforts to remove the provision from the final deal, but those were ultimately rejected.

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May 29, 2020 6 comments News

Twitter Issues Transparency Report

Twitter has issued a transparency report that discloses government requests for user information along with copyright takedown demands. The report indicates that there were 11 Canadian user information requests in the first half of 2012, behind only the U.S. (easily the most requests) and Japan.

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July 3, 2012 1 comment Must Reads

French Circumvent Twitter Ban on Election Results

The NY Times reports on how Twitter users in France circumvented a law prohibiting the early publication of election results over the weekend. Canadians faced a similar ban during the last election, but the government has since announced plans to change the law.

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April 24, 2012 4 comments Must Reads

Government Announces Plan to Drop Twitter Ban on Posting Early Election Results

Tim Uppal, the Minister of State for Democratic Reform, just announced via Twitter that the government plans to introduce legislation repealing sections of the Election Act that create a ban on communicating election results before all polls have closed across the country. The change reflects the reality of modern communications […]

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January 13, 2012 8 comments News