Archive for July, 2008

Avril Lavigne, YouTube Entrepreneur

Interesting article in the Globe and Mail describing how Avril Lavigne has earned about $2 million for herself, songwriters, and music publishers from YouTube.

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July 31, 2008 1 comment Must Reads

CRTC Confirms Do-Not-Call Registry By September 30th

The CRTC has today confirmed that the national do-not-call registry will launch by September 30th.  Given the number of exempt organizations – registered charities, political parties, polling companies, newspapers, businesses with a prior business relationship – Canadians will still need to individually opt-out of hundreds of additional organizations for the […]

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July 30, 2008 12 comments News

The Canadian Copyfight 2.0

Last week, I delivered a talk to the Toronto Fair Copyright for Canada chapter that chronicled the Canadian copyfight and stressed how important it is for Canadians to speak out now on the Canadian DMCA.  Audio and slides of that talk have been posted on Blip.tv and embedded below.  A […]

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July 30, 2008 2 comments News

The Canadian Copyfight 2.0

Last week, I delivered a talk to the Toronto Fair Copyright for Canada chapter that chronicled the Canadian copyfight and stressed how important it is for Canadians to speak out now on the Canadian DMCA.  Audio and slides of that talk have been posted on Blip.tv and embedded below.  A […]

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July 30, 2008 Comments are Disabled Stop CDMCA

61 Reforms to C-61, Day 28: TPMs – Interoperability Exception, Linux and DVDs

The emergence of open source software as a powerful alternative to proprietary software models has been an important business and societal development.  Open source software is today widely used by consumers (e.g., Firefox browser) and businesses (e.g., Linux operating system, Apache web server).  From a policy perspective, the Canadian government's professed goal is to create a level playing field so that the marketplace rather than laws will determine marketplace winners.  It has opposed attempts to create policy preferences for open source (over the objection of some advocates and countries) instead favouring a more neutral approach.

Notwithstanding the claims of neutrality, Bill C-61 creates significant marketplace impediments for open source software.  Achieving a level playing field requires interoperability so that differing computer systems can freely exchange data.  The bill includes an interoperability provision at Section 41.12 which states that the anti-circumvention provisions do not apply to:

a person who owns a computer program or a copy of it, or has a licence to use the program or copy, and who circumvents a technological measure that protects that program or copy for the sole purpose of obtaining information that would allow the person to make the program and any other computer program interoperable.

The problem with this provision is that it does not extend far enough to maintain a level playing field. 

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July 30, 2008 4 comments News