Post Tagged with: "anti-counterfeiting trade agreement"

USTR Posts ACTA Submissions

The USTR has posted four volumes of public submissions on its Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement consultation.  By contrast, Canada's DFAIT, which conducted a similar consultation this spring, offers only complete silence.

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July 16, 2008 Comments are Disabled Must Reads

G8 Pushes ACTA Completion By End of 2008

They may not want to tell anyone what the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement contains, but the G8 nations are willing to set a timeline for its completion.  In the final statement on IPRs today, the G8 leaders "encouraged the acceleration of negotiations to establish a new international legal framework, the Anti-Counterfeiting […]

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July 8, 2008 6 comments Must Reads

RIAA Demands for ACTA

KEI posts the RIAA's demands for ACTA as submitted to the USTR earlier this year.

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June 29, 2008 7 comments Must Reads

Government Should Lift Veil on ACTA Secrecy

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) focuses on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), which was shrouded in secrecy until a leaked summary of the agreement appeared on the Internet last month, and which has sparked widespread opposition as Canadians worry about the prospect of a trade deal that could lead to invasive searches of personal computers and increased surveillance of online activities. Last week, Canadian negotiators huddled with representatives from countries such as the United States, European Union, and Japan at the U.S. Mission in Geneva to continue the negotiations. 

While documents obtained under the Access to Information Act reveal internal ACTA discussions as early as 2006, the trade negotiations only came to the Canadian public's attention last fall when International Trade Minister David Emerson revealed the government's intention to participate in the negotiations.  Since the announcement, the Canadian government has been among the most secretive of all ACTA negotiating partners.  The Department of Foreign Affairs conducted a public consultation on the treaty in April; however, the government revealed little about either the timing or substance of the agreement.  By comparison, Australia launched a public consultation on the treaty before committing to participate in the ACTA talks.

Fears about the ACTA have spilled into the political arena as NDP MP Charlie Angus last week voiced concerns about its effects during Question Period in the House of Commons and Toronto-area Liberal MP Bob Rae blogged that it "augurs a ridiculously intrusive national and international apparatus to police practices that are as common as eating and breathing." With another round of talks set for next month in Japan, the government should use the opportunity to pressure its trading partners to lift the veil of ACTA secrecy.  Trade negotiators may prefer to remain outside of the spotlight, yet greater transparency is desperately needed.

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June 9, 2008 7 comments Columns

Government Should Lift Veil on ACTA Secrecy

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) focuses on the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA), which was shrouded in secrecy until a leaked summary of the agreement appeared on the Internet last month, and which has sparked widespread opposition as Canadians worry about the prospect of a trade deal that could lead to invasive searches of personal computers and increased surveillance of online activities. Last week, Canadian negotiators huddled with representatives from countries such as the United States, European Union, and Japan at the U.S. Mission in Geneva to continue the negotiations. 

While documents obtained under the Access to Information Act reveal internal ACTA discussions as early as 2006, the trade negotiations only came to the Canadian public's attention last fall when International Trade Minister David Emerson revealed the government's intention to participate in the negotiations.  Since the announcement, the Canadian government has been among the most secretive of all ACTA negotiating partners.  The Department of Foreign Affairs conducted a public consultation on the treaty in April; however, the government revealed little about either the timing or substance of the agreement.  By comparison, Australia launched a public consultation on the treaty before committing to participate in the ACTA talks.

Fears about the ACTA have spilled into the political arena as NDP MP Charlie Angus last week voiced concerns about its effects during Question Period in the House of Commons and Toronto-area Liberal MP Bob Rae blogged that it "augurs a ridiculously intrusive national and international apparatus to police practices that are as common as eating and breathing." With another round of talks set for next month in Japan, the government should use the opportunity to pressure its trading partners to lift the veil of ACTA secrecy.  Trade negotiators may prefer to remain outside of the spotlight, yet greater transparency is desperately needed.

Read more ›

June 9, 2008 Comments are Disabled Stop CDMCA