Post Tagged with: "crtc"

Reconciling Cancon Requirements in the Age of the Internet

My regular Law Bytes column (homepage version, Toronto Star version) provides some further commentary on last week's CRTC pay radio decision. I argue that the Commission made the best of a bad hand and delivered a policy approach that prioritizes Canadian artists by adapting Canadian content requirements to emerging new technologies.

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June 20, 2005 Comments are Disabled Columns

Who Supports Canadian Artists?

Among the winners and losers of yesterday’s CRTC pay radio decision, there is little doubt that Canadian artists emerged as the big winners. How big? Between the Siruis and XM bids, they’re in line to receive $40 million in funding for various artists programs in Canada over the next seven […]

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June 17, 2005 Comments are Disabled News

Satellite Radio with a Canadian Twist

The CRTC released its satellite radio decision earlier today. I'll have more to say about it in next week's column, but the short story is that the Commission has granted licenses to all three proposals but with stronger Canadian content requirements than the two satellite providers had initially offered.

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June 16, 2005 Comments are Disabled News

Cancon Week

This is shaping up to be a big week for Canadian content issues. On Thursday the CRTC will issue its satellite radio decision which is likely to feature discussion on how Canadian content requirements can or will be ported from traditional radio to satellite radio. Meanwhile, the Canadian Press is […]

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June 13, 2005 Comments are Disabled News

The Wrong Analogy, More on the CRTC VoIP Decision

My regular Law Bytes column (freely available linked version, Toronto Star version, homepage version) focuses on the CRTC’s VoIP decision. I begin by noting that when the Internet burst onto the public stage in the mid 1990s, legal scholars initially relied on analogies to identify an appropriate legal framework. Likening the Internet to the "Law of the Sea" or the "Law of Outer Space, their hope was that an existing body of law would provide a ready made solution to the Internet’s inevitable legal challenges. The approach failed, however, as the complexity of the Internet, as well as the genuinely novel issues it raised, rendered each successive proposal unsatisfactory.

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May 16, 2005 Comments are Disabled Columns