Archive for March 10th, 2010

Harper to Answer Questions on YouTube

Prime Minister Harper will be answering questions on YouTube over the next week, providing a chance to raise digital strategy issues in a digital environment

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March 10, 2010 Comments are Disabled Must Reads

Australia Says No Domestic Changes Due To ACTA

The Australian government has stated that it does not expect to make any changes to its domestic laws due to ACTA, hoping to persuade others to follow the Australian approach.

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March 10, 2010 2 comments Must Reads

Ontario Adds Internet Safety to School Curriculum

The Canadian Press reports that the Ontario government is adding Internet safety to the provincial elementary school curriculum.

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March 10, 2010 1 comment Must Reads

European Parliament ACTA Resolution Passes Overwhelmingly, Threatens Possible Court Action

The European Parliament today overwhelming approved a resolution on ACTA calling for transparency and raising concerns about substantive elements in the treaty such as the prospect of three strikes and personal border searches.  The final vote was 633 in favour, 13 against, and 16 abstentions.  The final approved text raises […]

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March 10, 2010 9 comments News

Casting a Vote Against Internet Voting

With the increasing shift from analog to digital, some elections officials are unsurprisingly chomping at the bit to move toward Internet-based voting.  My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes that last year, Elections Canada officials mused about the possibility of online voting trials, noting the potential benefits of increasing voter participation, particularly among younger demographics.

More recently, the province of Alberta opened the door to incorporating new technologies into their voting processes as part of an electoral reform package.  New trials would require the approval of a legislative committee, but the province's Chief Electoral Officer acknowledged that online voting may be coming, noting "online voting is something that's on the forefront of people's minds. . . people say, 'I can do my banking online, but I can't do my voting online'."

The enthusiasm for Internet voting is understandable. At first blush, there is a certain allure associated with the convenience of Internet voting, given the prospect of increased turnout, reduced costs, and quicker reporting of results.  Moreover, since other security sensitive activities such as banking and health care have gravitated online, supporters argue that elections can't be far behind. Yet before rushing into Internet voting trials, the dangers should not be overlooked.

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March 10, 2010 28 comments Columns