Archive for April, 2012

Canada’s Domain Name Agency to the Public: We Don’t Trust You

The Canadian Internet Registration Authority, the non-profit agency charged with managing the dot-ca domain name, has emerged in recent years as an important voice on Internet governance. Backed by a big bank account – CIRA earns millions of dollars each year for maintaining the domain name registry – it has launched an annual Internet governance forum attended by hundreds of Canadians, partnered with various groups to help small businesses establish an online presence, and sponsored many Canadian Internet-related events.

Yet just as CIRA begins to fulfill its potential as an “important public resource” (as described in its mandate letter from the Government of Canada), my weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) notes it has proposed a new governance structure that seeks to sideline the public by limiting the ability to serve on the CIRA board. With more than a million registrants, CIRA is one of Canada’s largest Internet organizations and its message to members is clear: we don’t trust you.

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April 30, 2012 11 comments Columns

Canada’s Domain Name Agency to the Public: We Don’t Trust You

Appeared in the Toronto Star on April 29, 2012 as Dot.ca manager doesn’t seem to trust Canadians The Canadian Internet Registration Authority, the non-profit agency charged with managing the dot-ca domain name, has emerged in recent years as an important voice on Internet governance. Backed by a big bank account […]

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April 30, 2012 Comments are Disabled Columns Archive

Government To Shift Do-Not-Call Enforcement Costs to Industry

The government has announced plans to shift the costs of CRTC enforcement of the do-not-call list to industry. The CRTC will conduct a consultation this spring with plans to implement the new structure by next April.

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April 30, 2012 3 comments Must Reads

What the Government Won’t Tell You Today About the Canada – EU Trade Agreement

The government is launching an all-out blitz on the proposed Canada – European Union Trade Agreement today with no less than 18 events planned across the country featuring 16 cabinet ministers and parliamentary secretaries. The speeches will emphasize the benefits of the proposed agreement to many areas of the economy, yet what is most noteworthy is what won’t be discussed. Industry Minister Christian Paradis is speaking, but he won’t be discussing copyright, patents, pharmaceuticals, or cultural policy as his speech will emphasize the pork industry. Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore won’t be talking about culture either as his speech is slated to focus on fish and seafood. And Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq is missing from the slate altogether.

The reason for the omissions are essential to understanding one of the primary sticking points with CETA. While the government says the deal is 75% completed, negotiators have consistently indicated that they left the toughest issues to the end. Those include rules of origin, agriculture, immigration and visa issues, and intellectual property.

The CETA intellectual property chapter leaked in 2010, revealing that the EU is seeking a complete overhaul of Canada’s IP laws. Initial demands on copyright included:

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April 27, 2012 10 comments News

Department of National Defence Uses Crown Copyright To Demand Removal of Leaked Document

The Department of National Defence is using crown copyright to demand the removal of a leaked government document that has been widely discussed and posted on the Internet. At issue is the Canadian Land Force Counter-Insurgency Operations Manual, which the Globe’s Doug Saunders described as “Canada’s military manual and operational […]

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April 26, 2012 5 comments News