Archive for September, 2008

Duceppe Points To Copyright As Area of Disagreement

Howard Knopf notes that disagreement over the copyright bill [MP3 version of CBC World At Six] was one of the issues specifically raised Bloc leader Gilles Duceppe's meeting last week with Prime Minister Stephen Harper, increasing the likelihood that copyright could emerge as an issue during the forthcoming election campaign.

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September 2, 2008 2 comments Must Reads

C-61 on Campus

Students return to school this week to be greeted by a series of articles critical of the soon-to-be defunct Bill C-61 (Ubessey, The Strand).

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September 2, 2008 2 comments Must Reads

Consumer Electronics Industry on Copyright Reform

Frank Lenk highlights the dangers of C-61 to the consumer electronics industry in a piece for MarketNews.

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September 2, 2008 1 comment Must Reads

Stephen Fry on GNU’s 25th Birthday

British writer and comedian Stephen Fry helps celebrate the 25th birthday of GNU.

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September 2, 2008 1 comment Must Reads

PickupPal Controversy Highlights Power of Networked Economy

My weekly technology law column (Toronto Star version, homepage version) "picks up" on the debate over PickupPal, a ride sharing service that operates around the world. Trentway-Wagar, a Peterborough-based bus company, has raised questions about the legality of the service in Ontario. PickupPal has about 100,000 registered users worldwide (approximately 10,000 in Ontario alone) who use the Internet service to connect and identify possible ride sharing partners.  The result is more carpools, less traffic congestion, and decreased emissions. Notwithstanding the benefits, Trentway-Wagar argues that the service violates the Ontario Public Vehicles Act because it allows drivers to collect money by offering strangers a ride. This is not the first time that the company has targeted ride sharing services.  In 2000, it succeeded in stopping Allo-Stop, then Quebec's biggest ride sharing company, from operating in Ontario.

The PickupPal debate has thus far focused on an outdated provincial law (the government has promised to review the legislation) and the environmental impact of rules that appear to discourage ride sharing. Yet there is a bigger story here. The law has been rendered out of date because the Internet facilitates new modes of production and organization that enable thousands of people to connect, share, and work together in ways that were previously limited larger, well-organized, and well-funded companies. As scholars such as Yochai Benkler and Clay Shirky have persuasively argued, these modes of production provide great promise.

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September 2, 2008 5 comments Columns