Text: Small Text  Normal Text  Large Text  Larger Text

    Blog Archive

    PrevPrevApril 2014NextNext
    SMTWTFS
      12345
    6789101112
    13141516171819
    20212223242526
    27282930

    Tens of Thousands Protest Against ACTA in Europe On the Weekend

    PDF  | Print |  E-mail
    Monday February 13, 2012
    Tens of thousands took to the streets over the weekend to protest against ACTA. Notable video and photos include Sofia, Bulgaria, Dresden, Germany, and Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Tags:
    , ,
    Share: Slashdot, Digg, Del.icio.us, Newsfeeder, Reddit, StumbleUpon, TwitterTagsShare
     

    Can You Hear Us Now?

    PDF  | Print |  E-mail
    Friday February 10, 2012
    The second reading debate on Bill C-11 will conclude today with the bill headed to committee for further hearings and possible amendment. Yesterday, the Globe published an opinion piece by Peter Nowak that juxtaposes the widespread consultation on copyright reform in Canada with digital lock provisions that "wilfully ignores" public opinion. Nowak notes how the U.S. ultimately responded to public concern in stopping SOPA, while the same appears to be happening in Europe as protests over the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement continue to grow (there are continent-wide protests planned for February 11th).

    One of my posts this week focused on concerns that Industry Minister Christian Paradis has said he cannot speculate on how Bill C-11's digital lock rules will be enforced. The post identifies numerous examples of how the rules could harm creators, students, researchers, consumers, and even the visually impaired (further background information on Bill C-11 here and here). Yet these concerns are not new and have been raised for several years. Indeed, it is instructive to see how the public concern over the digital lock rules and now possible inclusion of SOPA-style amendments has mushroomed over the years.


    Tags:
    , , , , ,
    Share: Slashdot, Digg, Del.icio.us, Newsfeeder, Reddit, StumbleUpon, TwitterTagsShare
    View
     

    Latvia Freezes ACTA Ratification, Germany Won't Sign For Now

    PDF  | Print |  E-mail
    Friday February 10, 2012
    Latvia has become the latest European country to freeze ratification of the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement and Germany has said it will await the European Parliament vote before deciding whether to sign the agreement. The moves comes as the mainstream media takes increasing notice of the ACTA protests (coverage from the Economist here) and continent-wide protests are planned for Saturday.
    Tags:
    , , , , ,
    Share: Slashdot, Digg, Del.icio.us, Newsfeeder, Reddit, StumbleUpon, TwitterTagsShare
     

    Will Canada - China Changes Include a Shift on Intellectual Property?

    PDF  | Print |  E-mail
    Tuesday February 07, 2012
    Prime Minister Stephen Harper arrived in China today for a high profile visit aimed at improving the Canada- China economic ties. Many have noted the change in tone from the Canadian government on China on rights issues, but the intellectual property story is worth noting here as well. Unlike a U.S. visit, which is likely to place IP issues at the very top of the list, the Canadian visit is unlikely to emphasize the issue. Indeed, Canada would do well to consider shifting its approach to China on intellectual property.

    While China-based piracy is unquestionable a concern, Canada has too often used the issue to curry favour with the U.S. at the expense of developing the China relationship. In recent years, our support for the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (which deliberately excluded China) and now the Trans Pacific Partnership (which also excludes China) does little to help relations. China could be a strategic ally on global IP issues as both countries face significant external pressure for reform. While compliance with international rules should be the starting point for any dialogue, focusing on the flexibility that exists at international law to address domestic concerns is in both our interests.

    The biggest Canadian blunder was the decision to join a U.S. complaint against China at the World Trade Organization in 2007 alleging that China’s domestic laws, border measures, and criminal penalties for intellectual property violations did not comply with its international treaty obligations. The case was a big loss. China was required to amend parts of its copyright law but on the big issues - border measures and IP enforcement - almost all of the contested laws were upheld as valid.

    More interesting are the background documents that demonstrate that the Canadian government was unable to muster credible evidence of harm among Canadian companies.


    Tags:
    , , , ,
    Share: Slashdot, Digg, Del.icio.us, Newsfeeder, Reddit, StumbleUpon, TwitterTagsShare
    View
     
    << Start < Prev 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Next > End >>

    Results 51 - 54 of 431